Joe Sacco depicts one dreadful day of The Great War

0 Posted by - October 16, 2013 - Blog, Visual art, Word

The latest book by comic artist Joe Sacco isn’t really a book at all. The Great War is a single 24-foot-long panoramic image that illustrates the first day of the battle of the Somme on July 1, 1916.

And while the style is certainly Sacco, The Great War differs from his previous projects, such as Safe Area Gorazde and Footnotes in Gaza, in ways beyond the book’s physical format.

From The Guardian:

There are literally thousands of people in The Great War, along with horses, heavy artillery, barbed wire, trenches and, as the narrative progresses, explosions, stretchers and graves. […] There are no boxes of text or speech bubbles, no individuated characters, instead Sacco portrays a mass event in painstaking, monochrome, almost technical detail. It’s like a cross between Hergé and the Chapman brothers; the Bayeux Tapestry as a silent movie.

The Great War will hit bookstore shelves on November 4.

The Great War by Joe Sacco

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